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HELP Identify this harp


#1

Hello. I have no clue who the manufacture of this harp is. It’s my girlfriends harp that her grandfather used to play. An ex of hers threw it against a wall (JERK) and cracked the wood at the leavers. I’m a good woodworker so I believe I can fix and reinforce that. But I digressed a little.
My question for this group is: does anyone know what manufacturer this harp is? classification for a harp this size? and what strings would I order for it. The old ones are in good shape - my only experience is with guitar strings and I know that they tend to stretch/snap if one tries to reuse them.
Any info you guys have, or a point into the right direction if I’m in the wrong place, is greatly appreciated

I’ve uploaded 2 pictures of it. If you need closeup of a specific area let me know. I didn’t know how to measure them, I took the longest measurement (shown in picture) and it was about 30"

Cheers
Doug


#2

Could only upload one image at a time


#3

Hi Doug,

Finding out what strings to put on an unknown harp can be tricky! That harp looks to me like it might be a 19-string Roosebeck or Mid-East lap harp, but I’m not sure what model. It looks sort of similar to this one, except yours might have a solid wood soundboard instead of a laminated one:

http://www.mid-east.com/Strings/Roosebeck-Celtic-Style-Harp/Roosebeck-Pixie-Harp-19-String

I’m afraid I’m not familiar enough with that particular harp to be able to advise you on buying strings, so there are a few ways you might go about that:

  1. You could try doing some more research or contacting Roosebeck to see if you can find out what model yours actually is and what strings they advise.

  2. You could guess that it might use the same strings as the Pixie model, in which case there’s a link to an owner’s guide on that page with some info about string sets. The worst case scenario with guessing is that you end up putting on strings that are much too heavy for the harp, and the tension could pull the harp apart. But I think that’s probably unlikely to happen in this case.

  3. You could contact a company like Robinson’s Harp Shop that designs custom string sets and may even recognize your harp and have some specs already on file.

Best of luck!


#4

Actually, here’s one more idea: If you happen to have calipers or a micrometer in your tool box, you could measure the diameters of the strings that are on there and try to match them (allowing for them to have gotten a little bit thinner over years of stretching out). This should work pretty well as long as there are no wrapped strings in the bass. If you can figure out what diameters you need, then you can buy individual monofilament strings here: http://manufacturing.dustystrings.com/strings/order-harp-strings-online/monofilaments-diameter/


#5

Hello Christy

Thank you for your reply. I continued to research on my own as will and found that it is a Roosebeck. This one is older but it is 99% identical to the one they still sell today.
Since Roosbeck sell the replacement string set I’ve purchased through them, though I do appreciate having been able to post to this forum to gain help from others.